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DAVID BALL & THAT CAROLINA SOUND BACK IN AUSTIN!

DAVID BALL & THAT CAROLINA SOUND RECREATE THE SOUND OF
UNCLE WALT’S BAND WITH CD RELEASE SHOW AT THE 04 CENTER

AUSTIN, Texas – (October 17, 2019) – Grammy Award winning artist David Ball will recreate the sound of Americana pioneers, Uncle Walt’s Band, with a CD/Vinyl Release show at The 04 Center on Friday, November 15th.

An American In Texas returns nearly 40 years after its initial release, this time on LP, CD, and Digital. Originally released in 1980, it was the second album from Americana pioneers Uncle Walt’s Band, of which Ball was a founding member and upright bassist. The original 12-track vinyl is complimented by an expanded 25-track CD containing all 8 tracks from their cassette only Six • Twenty Six • Seventy Nine, and five previously unissued live and studio tracks. 

Called the Bluegrass Beatles by critics, Lyle Lovett wrote, “Those boys from Carolina, they sure enough could sing.” The album will be distributed for streaming and download on all digital platforms, with a physical CD available at independent record stores. Pre-order online here

In early 2017, David Ball revisited the music of Uncle Walt’s Band at an Austin house show with Warren and Marshall Hood (son and nephew of UWB co-founder Champ Hood). The overwhelming response created That Carolina Sound, and a string of sold-out shows have followed.

On a solo acoustic tour a few years prior, Lyle was asked about the unique sound of his music. “It’s that Carolina sound!”

Doors for this CD/Vinyl Release will open at 7:00 with show at 8:00. Tickets: https://www.04center.com/events/2019/11/15/kessler-presents-david-ball-amp-that-carolina-sound“Flash back, for a moment, beyond the just-finished South by Southwest to last year’s SXSW. Its 10-day run had just kicked off when, in a show that wasn’t even part of the festivities, Nashville songwriter David Ball joined cousins Warren and Marshall Hood at the Saxon Pub to revisit the music of beloved 1970s-’80s Austin trio Uncle Walt’s Band. Marveling at the magic brought back to life, listening to the sincere testimonials and lovely guest-vocal turns by Uncle Walt’s Band devotees Kelly Willis, Marcia Ball and Jimmie Dale Gilmore, I wondered how I could see anything for the rest of SXSW that would be as good as this. And I didn’t.” -Peter Blackstock, Austin American-Statesman, 3/26/19″Uncle Walt’s Band predicted Americana by 30 years…but they were more polished and practiced than most down-home sounds now in that field.” Barry Mazor, Wall Street Journal, “Roots Now” ACME Radio Nashville 4/17/19###

About The Boys in The Band 
David Ball grew up in Spartanburg, SC where he learned to play guitar but later honed his skills on the upright bass, which led to a gig playing bass in Uncle Walt’s Band, credited as the first Americana act. The legendary trio was headed by Walter Hyatt and also included Champ Hood. A solo career led Ball to Nashville where he signed a publishing deal and later, a recording contract.  David’s music came full circle when Lyle Lovett reached back into Uncle Walt’s Band repertoire to include one of David’s early songs, “Don’t You Think I Feel It Too” on his 2009 disc, Natural Forces. David won a Grammy Award for the song “Old Folks At Home (Swanee River)” from the album Beautiful Dreamer – The Songs of Stephen Foster. (2005) Fourteen of his singles have entered the Billboard charts, including “Thinkin’ Problem” and “Riding With Private Malone,” which made Ball one of the first artists to take an indie single to the Country Top 5. He has recorded a total of seven studio albums, including his platinum certified Thinkin’ Problem.  The title track was the top selling country song of 1994. In 2013 David Ball became one of the first living members to be inducted into the Historic Spartanburg Music Trail in his hometown of Spartanburg SC, joining other notables such as Hank Garland, Don Reno, Buck Trent and the Marshall Tucker Band. He won the 2016 Operation Troop Aid Chris Kyle Patriot Award, for his extensive work with our active duty servicemen and women. Ball released Come See Me, his 10th studio album, in 2018.

Warren Hood started playing classical violin at age 11 in the school orchestra, later studying privately with Bill Dick. He won classical music competitions, including the Pearl Amster Youth Concerto Competition and the Austin Youth Award, which gave him the opportunity to perform as a soloist on “Lalo Symphonie Espagnole” with the Austin Symphony, conducted by Peter Bay. After high school, Warren earned a rare scholarship to Berklee College of Music where he majored in Violin Performance. At Berklee, Warren earned the coveted String Achievement Award, an award chosen by faculty to honor talent and as a vote of confidence on future success. 
A multi-instrumentalist (violin, guitar, mandolin) and accomplished singer-songwriter, Warren is described in the press a lot of different ways: “virtuoso” ”seven time Austin Music Award winner – BestStrings” ”Texas fiddler” ”Chet Baker crooner” “bluegrass picker” – but for him it all kind of blends together into everything he does (and what he does doesn’t always have fiddle). Warren says slyly that“playing different styles of music is like speaking different languages – the difference between violin and fiddle is how you roll your Rs. The more languages you speak the more people you can talk to.”
Warren spends as much time with his band as he does playing and recording alongside other artists: David Ball, The Bodeans, Hayes Carll, Joe Ely, Alejandro Escovedo, Robert Earl Keen, Ben Kweller, Little Feat, Lyle Lovett, Joan Osborne, Toni Price, Bob Schneider, South Austin Jug Band, Redd Volkaert, Jerry Jeff Walker The Waybacks, Bob Weir, Bruce Robison and Kelly Willis and more.

Hailing from Spartanburg, SC, Marshall Hood is Champ Hood’s nephew, currently residing in Austin, TX.  Like all of the Hoods, Marshall rounds out a family of wildly talented musicians with effortless guitar work and a knack for crafting the most charming of songs – so reminiscent of his Uncle Champ it’s sometimes hard to tell the difference. After a successful run in high school with The DesChamps Band, a band he founded to honor Champ after his passing in 2001, Marshall made the pilgrimage to Austin, TX and began accompanying famed Austin singer, Toni Price, on her long-running residency at the renowned Continental Club. It would be here, of course, where Marshall firmly planted his roots and became a fixture in the eclectic Austin music scene. Marshall took a brief hiatus from Toni Price’s band from 2007-2011, though, touring the country with the young Americana group, The Belleville Outfit – making stops along the way at major festivals like Austin City Limits, Bonnaroo, and Merlefest. As an original member of The Belleville Outfit, Marshall recorded and released two critically acclaimed, independent albums, and picked up a nomination from the Americana Music Association for Best New/Emerging Artist.After The Belleville Outfit disbanded in 2011, Marshall turned his focus to his solo work, thus far releasing an self-titled EP, and forming Marshall Hood and the Bads – a clever turn on his cousin’s band, Warren Hood and the Goods. Much like Uncle Walt’s Band, Marshall’s songs can’t be pigeonholed into any one category – they transcend any one genre. He’s the consummate musician. He plays for hours and hours a day, playing as a member of The Warren Hood Band, Tuesday nights with Toni Price, and a regular at house concerts and a project called Sessions on Mary, a private house concert that is streamed live to viewers around the world.